Michuhol-gu, INCHEON Metropolitan city

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The Origin of Dong Names

Sungui-dong

숭의로터리
제물포역

Geographically, Michuhol-gu is located in the southern part of Incheon Metropolitan City, but it is right at the heart of the city's administrative districts. Michuhol-gu is just 40 minutes away from Seoul, the capital of Korea. Michuhol-gu occupies 24.84㎢ area, representing 2.5% of the total area of Incheon Metropolitan City. It stretches 6.2㎞ from east to west and 5.9㎞ from north to south.

Dohwa-dong

수봉산(현충탑)
제물포스마트타운

Dohwa-dong was originally called Baemal, Ssukgol, and Domadari. The region was named as Domagyo-ri and Hwa-dong during the district name changing event in Incheonbu in August 1903. On March 1, 1914, Bucheon-gun was newly established, and Daso-myeon and Juan-myeon were consolidated and named as Daju-myeon. The region was later renamed as Dohwa-ri on November 20, 1914 when all other district names in Incheonbu were changed.
On January 15, 1937, a Japanese district name of "Aeng-jeong" was given to the region. After the independence, the region was renamed as Dohwa-dong on January 1, 1946.
Hwa-dong and Sukgol mean rice farm, while Domagyo-ri means a village that served as roadway for horses when Gyeongin Highway was built. These names mainly indicated the entrance road of Subong park. The name of Dohwa-ri comes from 'do' (bridge) of Domagyo-ri and 'hwa' (flower) of Hwa-dong. Aeng-jeong means cherry blossoms, the national flower of Japan.
Ssukgol was a farmland located near Seon-in Sports Complex of these days, and this farmland was connected to Gaegeonneo via Beonjeoginaru.
It was divided into Dohwa 2(i)-dong and Dohwa 3(sam)-dong in 1977, and there are now two dongs to combine Dohwa-2dong and Dohwa 3(sam)-dong in 2009.

juan-dong

동대표이미지1
동대표이미지2

Originally, Juan-dong was Chunghubu in Daso-myeon , Incheonbu, and Sami (or Shimi) village. The region was named as Chunghunbu-ri and Sami-ri in August of 1903 when all the district names in Incheonbu have been decided. In May of 1906, the region was renamed as Chunghun-ri and Sami-ri. On March 1, 1914, Bucheon-gun was born, and on April 1st of the same year, Juan-myeon and Daso-myeon were consolidated and named as Sachung-ri. Some parts of Ganseok-dong and Gwangyo-dong were consolidated and named as Juanjeong right after the incorporation of Sachung-ri to Incheonbu on October 1, 1936. Immediately after the liberation from the colonial rule, the region was renamed as Juan-dong on January 1, 1946. The region was then divided into Juan 1(il)-dong and Juan 2(i)-dong on January 9, 1950.
The name "Chunghun" was given to the region because there was a dike of Chunghunbu (a government institution) in the region. Samiri means a gentleman with high moral reputation, and it especially refers to Lee Heon-gyeong who was a renowned minister who lived in the region during the end of the Joseon Dynasty.
The name 'Juan' means a red goose. There is a mountain called Juan Mountain because its soil is red and it resembles a goose. Hence, the name Juan was given to the region. The present Ganseok-dong and Guwol-dong were formerly part of this region.
When the Gyeonginseon Railroad was first opened, Juan Station was located in Ganseok-dong. This station was later transferred to Juan-dong, but its original name was retained. Juan Salt Farm was opened in the region around that time, and the region was finally named as Juan-dong as it stands today. During the 1970s, there were 5 dongs in Juan, which was divided into 8 dongs in the 1980s and remains the same today.

Gwangyo-dong

인천종합버스터미널
중앙공원

Gwangyo-dong was the center of Incheon-bu during Goryeo Dynasty, thus it was called Upnai (downtown). In recent centuries, this area was called Upnai and Seunggiburak. During the district- renaming event In August of 1903, these were renamed as Upnai-ri, and Dongchonseunggi-ri. During the district -renaming event In May of 1906, Upnai-ri was divided into Gwanchung-ri, Hyanggyo-ri, and Seunggi-ri, while Seunggi-ri was divided into Daeseunggi-ri and Soseunggi-ri. Bucheon-gun was first established on March 1, 1914, and. on April 1s of the same year, the region (today's Gwangyo-dong) fell under the jurisdiction of Munhak-myeon, Bucheon-gun.
The name "Chunghun" was given to the region because there was a dike of Chunghunbu (a government institution) in the region. Samiri means a gentleman with high moral reputation, and it especially refers to Lee Heon-gyeong who was a renowned minister who lived in the region during the end of the Joseon Dynasty.
The name 'Juan' means a red goose. There is a mountain called Juan Mountain because its soil is red and it resembles a goose. Hence, the name Juan was given to the region. The present Ganseok-dong and Guwol-dong were formerly part of this region.
When the Gyeonginseon Railroad was first opened, Juan Station was located in Ganseok-dong. This station was later transferred to Juan-dong, but its original name was retained. Juan Salt Farm was opened in the region around that time, and the region was finally named as Juan-dong as it stands today. During the 1970s, there were 5 dongs in Juan, which was divided into 8 dongs in the 1980s and remains the same today.

Munhak-dong

문학산
문학경기장

Munhak-dong is named after Munhak Mountain in Incheon Bu, in which the original roots of Incheon can be traced. According to a dolmen discovered in 1927, it is estimated that the original ancestors had settled here from the New Stone Age Munhak Mountain was the place where the Michuhol Kingdom originated, thus it is a highly regarded historic place. We can still see a part of the Doho Bu Office inside the Munhak elementary school. Also included in the historical sites are Incheon Hyanggyo, Haksan Sowon Site, and Suchunhyun Hill, the place where people prayed to the heavens. Samhohyun's meaning comes from the times when the Chinese officials were departing back to China from Korea through Nunghodae and the people seeing them off called their names three times as a farewell greeting (Sam, "three." Ho, "called").
Most remarkably, it was one of seven fishing villages that were promoted to Inju and were developed during the Goryeo Dynasty. Since the Port of Incheon opened in 1883, Kamriso moved to Nae Ri, and after that time, it has been on the decline. During the administrative district reshuffling in 1914, the region became a part of Gwangyo-ri Munhak-myeon, Bucheon-gun. In 1936, the region was integrated into Incheonbu and was named as Munhak-jeong. During the expansion of the first Incheon Bu Station in 1936, the region was annexed to Incheon Bu and became Munhak Jeong. It was later renamed as Gwangyo Dong in 1946 and Munhak-dong in 1977.

Hagik-dong

인천지방검찰청
학나래도서관

Hagik-dong's name originated from the shape of the mountain that resembles a crane with open wings.
There is an old dolmen in this area, making this area historically meaningful because human beings are assumed to have lived here since the New Stone Age. There was a village called Jangjagol during the era of Buyeo, and also a village named Haetgol during Baekjae Dynasty. Haetgol means a place that yields clam shells, thus it can be assumed that this place might have been close to the sea.
During the Joseon Dynasty (10 years into King Sukjong's era), several people from the Bupyeong Lee family moved to this region and settled down near Jangjagol, forming a family village. There was a renowned gentleman called Sir Jeun in the family. The region was named as Jeun-ri in commemoration of his high reputation and moral influences. The name was then changed to Hagik-ri Munhak-myeon Bucheon-gun in 1914 during the administrative district reshuffling of Incheonbu, . Its name was later changed to Hakjeong-ri in 1936 when the region was incorporated to Incheonbu during the first extension of Incheonbu area. The current name Hagik-dong was given to the region in 1946, shortly after the liberation from the Japanese colonial rule.

Yonghyeon-dong

인하문화의거리
용정근린공원

Yonghyeon-dong was originally called Birang-dong under the control of Daso-myeon, but it was divided into Dokjeong-ri and Birang-ri in August of 1903 when all other districts within Incheonbu were named. The name of Birang-ri was changed into Dokjeong-ri and Biryong-ri in 1906. These districts kept their original name while all the other districts within Incheonbu were renamed in May of 1906. Bucheon-gun changed all its district names on March 1, 1914, while Biryong-ri and Dokjeong-ri were annexed into Yongjeong-ri, in which 'yong' was named after 'Biryong', and 'jeong' after 'Dokjeong'.
Under the Japanese colonial rule, the region was renamed as IlJichul-joeng, which once again changed to Yonghyeon-dong on January 15, 1937 right after independence was obtained. The region was then divided to Yonghyeon 1(il)-dong and Yonghyeon 2(i)-dong on January 15, 1950 when Incheon City increased the number of dongs within its district. The name 'Dokjeong' is composed of 'dok' (to study) and 'jeong' (pavillion), and there was a pavilion which was used as 'Seodang' (an old type of school) during the Joseon Dynasty. The name 'Birang' is composed of 'bi' (to fly) and 'rang' (ocean wave), and therefore, the name 'Birang' means 'ocean waves are flying to the sky'. The name "Yonghyeon" means the appearance of a dragon in the region used to be called Yonggol (a dragon village). The Japanese name "Iljichul-jeong" means a village where the sun is rising. Yonghyeon-dong was divided into West Yonghyeon-dong and East Yonghyeon-dong which were once again divided into 4 dongs in 1979 and into 5 dongs in 1980. There are now four dongs to combine Yonghyeon 1(il)-dong and Yonghyeon 4(sa)-dong in 2009.